CognitiveID is an actual human interface used as an Identity Test to Prove It’s You when accessing accounts and authorizing transactions for online activities. 
Use your own unique story and life experiences, your memories, to get to your online accounts and conduct transactions that no one else can.
Here is an example of one of my life experiences.
Julie Gomez was my First Girlfriend when I was in Dallas High School in 1975.  She gave me a Pen as a graduation gift. Later while in college she became a Golfer.
My mind is like a brain vault.  My life experiences are formed uniquely in my own way.  I own them because no one else knows how they are stored in my brain vault.  In the example above, when I hear the name Julie Gomez I am immediately flooded with memories associated with her name.   “First Girlfriend, Dallas High School, 1975, Pen, Golfer”.  These are the fun memories I will always remember.  Every one of us has infinite stories uniquely kept in our brain vault.  Since we already have them, we own them.  Can we use these unique memories and associations to teach a computer to learn who we are?  Would it be fun and exciting to use them to access our online accounts without having to memorize anything?  Would it be more secure since no one can steal or copy my memories and the things I associate them with? 
Let me show you how we can teach a computer to verify it is you.   Here’s the example of my life experience:
This is what the computer prompts you with:
Fill in the blanks with my story and its associated memories:
Let’s pretend my story is your story.  We teach the computer to display your story and mix them with false information.  All we ask is for you to select the correct memory association.  It is easy and fun because you own them.  It is almost impossible for anyone else, like a hacker, to guess it right.
Here is how it would like on a computer screen.  Each column in the table below has the memory of Julie Gomez.  Each column in the next table are the memories associated with her name.
Instinctively you select Dallas High School from Column 1, 1975 from Column 2, and Pen from Column 3.  These are the memories associated with Julie Gomez.  No one else, not even that hacker, would know which one to select. The next time you access your online account the computer will show you this story in a different order.  If you teach the computer more stories, the computer will ask for another story.  It is always different, hence useless to copy or phish because they will not be used the next time.  What was described above is How to make your own CognitiveID.
It is hard to remember what you have not truly experienced but hard to forget what you already know.  The next time you access your online account, ask yourself “Does the computer know it’s really me?”

Click here to learn more about Usernames

Click here to learn more about Stories

Click here to learn more about Memories

Click here to learn more about Associations